Mae Jemison Bio, Wiki, Age, Husband, Astronaut, Net Worth, Salary, and Instagram

Mae Jemison Biography

Mae Jemison is an American engineer, physician, and previous NASA astronaut of African descent. Further, she served as the initial black woman to travel into space when she served as a mission specialist aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour. She spent 7 days, 22 hours, and 30 minutes in space.

Mae Jemison Age

Jemison was born on October 17, 1956, in Decatur, Alabama, United States. She is 66 years old as of 2022.

Mae Jemison Height

Jemison stands at an approximate height of 5 feet and 6 inches.

Mae Jemison Family

Jemison was born to Charlie Jemison and Dorothy Jemison (née Green) in Decatur, Alabama. The couple had three children counting Jemison. While her father served as a maintenance supervisor for a charity organization, her mom served as an elementary school teacher of English and math at the Ludwig van Beethoven Elementary School in Chicago. Initially, they resided in Woodlawn and later the Morgan Park neighborhoods. While growing up, she loved studying nature and human physiology.

At the age of 8 or 9, she started ballet and joined high school at 12 years old. While in high school she served on the cheerleading team and the Modern Dance Club. Furthermore, she learned a number of dance styles counting African and Japanese, as well as ballet, jazz, and modern dance.

Mae Jemison Husband

Jemison is very private about her personal life therefore it is not known if she is in any relationship. There are also no rumors of Jemison being in any past relationship with anyone.

Photo of Mae Jemison
Photo of Mae Jemison

Mae Jemison Net Worth

Jemison has an estimated net worth of between $1 Million-$5 Million which she has earned through her successful career as an

Mae Jemison Salary

Jemison earns an annual salary ranging from $ 45,000 – $ 110,500.

Mae Jemison Education

When she completed her high school studies at m Chicago’s Morgan Park High School in 1973, she went on to attend Stanford University at the age of 16. Even at this stage, she received discrimination from her teachers same as the absence of her teacher’s support of her interest in science when she was younger. While in high school she served on the cheerleading team and the Modern Dance Club. At Stanford, she served as head of the Black Students Union and choreographed a musical and dance production dubbed Out of the Shadows.

During her senior year in college, she struggled with the option of medical school and being a professional dancer after graduation. In 1997, she graduated and attained her Bachelor Of Science degree in Chemical Engineering and a Bachelor Of Arts degree in African and African-American studies. Also, she pursued studies connected to her childhood interest in space and initially considered applying to NASA. Further, she joined Cornell University and graduated with a Medical Degree from the institution in 1981.

In her training, she went to Cuba to conduct a study sponsored by American Medical Student Association. Also, she went to Thailand and served at a Cambodian refugee camp. Further, she served Flying Doctors stationed in East Africa. Moreover, she continued to study dance by enrolling in classes at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater while at Cornell University.

Mae Jemison Career

Jemison is an engineer, physician, and previous NASA astronaut of African descent. Further, she served as the initial black woman to travel into space when she served as a mission specialist aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour. She spent 7 days, 22 hours, and 30 minutes in space. In 1987, she joined NASA’s astronaut corps and earned the nomination to serve on the STS-47 mission.

During the mission, she orbited the Earth for just about eight days on September 12–20, 1992. Even though she was aware of wanting to study science, the show, Star Trek, and African-American actress, Nichelle Nichols’ depiction of Lieutenant Uhura further fanned her interest in space. At the age of 8 or 9, she started ballet and joined high school at 12 years old. While in high school she served on the cheerleading team and the Modern Dance Club. Furthermore, she learned a number of dance styles counting African and Japanese, as well as ballet, jazz, and modern dance.

When she was 14, she auditioned for the leading role of Maria in West Side Story. Even though she didn’t get the leading role, she served as a background dancer. Upon her graduation in 1981, she served at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center as an intern in 1982. Additionally, she served Ross–Loos Medical Group as a general practitioner. Further, she joined the Peace Corps staff in 1983 and served as a medical officer until 1985. In pursuit of her astronaut career, she applied to NASA after attaining inspiration from the flights of Sally Ride and Guion Bluford.

Her work with NASA before her shuttle launch counted launch support activities at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and confirmation of Shuttle computer software in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL). After leaving NASA in 1993, she founded a technology research company. Later, she developed a non-profit educational foundation. Through the foundation, the principal of the 100-Year Starship project sponsored by DARPA. Additionally, she possesses a number of honorary doctorates. Else, she serves as an inductee of the National Women’s Hall of Fame and the International Space Hall of Fame.

After LeVar Burton discovered Jemison’s avid Star Trek fan, she enquired if she had an interest in being on the show. In 1993, she served as Lieutenant Palmer in Star Trek: The Next Generation on the episode “Second Chances.” Hence, she served as the initial real-life astronaut to feature on Star Trek. From 1999 to 2005, she served as an appointed Andrew Dickson White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University. To boot, she serves as an active public speaker who privately and publicly endorses science and technology.

Else, she made an appearance as host and technical consultant of the science series World of Wonder which aired on the Discovery Channel from 1994 to 1998. In 2006, she partook in a PBS television miniseries hosted by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., African American Lives. The series trails the family history of eight famous African-Americans in the utilization of historical research and genetic techniques. Further, she partook in the Red Dress Heart Truth fashion show, adorning Lyn Devon, during the 2007 New York Fashion Week to aid in raising money to fight heart disease.

In May 2007, she served as the graduation commencement speaker and only the 11th person in the 52-year history of Harvey Mudd College to be granted an honorary D.Eng. degree. On February 17, 2008, she served as the featured speaker for the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Alpha Kappa Alpha, the initial sorority established by African-American college women. Jemison paid homage to Alpha Kappa Alpha by carrying the sorority’s banner with her on her shuttle flight. Her space suit serves as a part of the sorority’s national traveling Centennial Exhibit.

Also, she serves as an honorary member of Alpha Kappa Alpha. Alongside, previous First Lady Michelle Obama, she partook in a forum for promising girls in the Washington, D.C. public schools in March 2009. In 2014, she appeared at Wayne State University for their yearly Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Tribute Luncheon. Additionally, in 2016, she affiliated with Bayer Corporation to endorse and advance science literacy in schools, spotlighting hands-on experimentation.

Further, she partook in the Michigan State University’s lecture series, “Slavery to Freedom: An American Odyssey,” in February 2017. In May 2017, she gave the commencement speech at Rice University. During a speech at Western Michigan University, she discussed the 100-Year Plan, science and education and other topics in May 2017. LEGO issued the “Women of NASA” set, with Minifigures of Jemison, Margaret Hamilton, Sally Ride, and Nancy Grace Roman in 2017. On March 8th, 2019(International Women’s Day), the Google Doodle featured a quote from her: “Never be limited by other people’s limited imaginations.”

Mae Jemison Books

Jemison’s initial book, Find Where the Wind Goes (2001), serves as a chronicle of her life written for children. In the book, she depicts her childhood, time at Stanford and in the Peace Corps, and as an astronaut. Additionally, she alongside Dana Meachen Rau co-authored A True Book series of four children’s books published in 2013. Each book has a “Find the Truth” challenge, true or false questions answers to which are uncovered at the end of the story.

Mae Jemison Arrest

In the spring of 1996, Jemison was apprehended by Nassau Bay police officer, Henry Hughes for allegedly making an illegal U-turn. Hughes arrested her after discovering an outstanding warrant on Jemison for a speeding ticket. During her apprehension, he twisted her wrist,  forced her to the ground, and had her walk barefooted from the patrol car into the police station. Later, Jemison filed a complaint and voiced that the officer er physically and emotionally mistreated her.

Her attorney voiced that Jemison believed that she had paid the speeding ticket years ago. For several hours, she was in jail and received treatment at an area hospital following her release for deep bruises and a head injury. The Nassau Bay officer attained a suspension with pay pending an investigation. However, the police investigation cleared him of wrongdoing. Else, she filed a lawsuit against the city of Nassau Bay and the officer.

Mae Jemison Interesting Facts

  • To her surprise, she discovered that she is 13% East Asian in her genetic makeup after partaking in a PBS television miniseries hosted by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., African American Lives. Also, she discovered that some of her paternal ancestors served as slaves at a plantation in Talladega County, Alabama.
  • She built and owns a dance studio in her home. Further, she choreographed and produced a number of shows of modern jazz and African dance.
  • Jemison is fluent in Russian, Japanese, and Swahili.
  • Further, she served as a medical officer in Africa for two years.
  • She was arrested in the spring of 1996 due to a traffic stop by a Texas police officer. Later, she filed a complaint against the officer and accused him of police brutality.
  • She spent 7 days, 22 hours, and 30 minutes in space.
  • Additionally, she served as the initial black woman in space. On a side note, she went to space at the age of 31.
  • Moreover, she left NASA citing she wanted to pursue interests in “teaching, mentoring, health care issues and increasing participation in science and technology of those who have traditionally been left out.” 
  • During her career journey, she faced double discrimination as an African-American woman.
  • From 1990 to 1992, she served on the board of directors of the World Sickle Cell Foundation
  • She named her foundation, the Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence in honor of her mother
  • From 1995 to 2002, she served at Dartmouth College as a professor of environmental studies. Also, she served as an Andrew D. White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University.

Mae Jemison Quotes

Listed below are some of Jemison’s quotes;

“Never be limited by other people’s limited imaginations… If you adopt their attitudes, then the possibility won’t exist because you’ll have already shut it out… You can hear other people’s wisdom, but you’ve got to re-evaluate the world for yourself.”-Mae Jemison

Being first gives you responsibility. You have a public platform and you must choose how to use it. I use mine to help folks become more comfortable with the idea that science is integral to our world. I vowed that I would talk about my work and ask people about theirs – the nitty-gritty details. These conversations are critical.”-Mae Jemison

“I’m very aware of the fact that I’m not the first African-American woman who had the skills, the talent, the desire to be an astronaut. I happen to be the first one NASA selected.”-Mae Jemison

Don’t let anyone rob you of your imagination, your creativity, or your curiosity. It’s your place in the world; it’s your life. Go on and do all you can with it, and make it the life you want to live”-Mae Jemison

“The best way to make dreams come true is to wake up.”-Mae Jemison

“When I’m asked about the relevance to Black people of what I do, I take that as an affront. It presupposes that Black people have never been involved in exploring the heavens, but this is not so. Ancient African empires — Mali, Songhai, Egypt — had scientists, astronomers. The fact is that space and its resources belong to all of us, not to any one group.”-Mae Jemison

Mae Jemison Social Media Platforms

She is active on her social media accounts and is often seen posting on her Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. She has over 10.5K followers on Instagram.

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